Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations

Journal Article

  1. Chui J, Murkin JM, Posner KL, Domino KB. Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury After General Anesthesia: A Qualitative Systematic Review. Anesth Analg 2018;127:134-43  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Professional Liability Related, General Anesthesia, Nerve Injury, Physiologic Monitoring, Quality of Care
  2. Prielipp RC, Weinkauf JL, Esser TM, Thomas BJ, Warner MA: Falls From the OR or Procedure Table. Anesth Analg 125:846-51, 2017  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Professional Liability Related, Trauma, Quality of Care
  3. Honardar MR, Posner KL, Domino K.B. Delayed Detection of Esophageal Intubation in Anesthesia Malpractice Claims: Brief Report of a Case Series. Anesth Analg 2017;125(6):1948-51  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, General Anesthesia, Respiratory System Damaging Events, Physiologic Monitoring, Quality of Care
  4. Maxwell, B.G., Posner, K.L., Wong, J.K., Oakes, D.A., Kelly, N.E., Domino, K.B., Ramamoorthy, C.: Factors Contributing to Adverse Perioperative Events in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: A structured analysis of cases from the Closed Claims Project. Congenit Heart Dis. 10:21-9, 2015  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Physiologic Monitoring, Quality of Care
    This article reviews factors related to adverse events in relation to adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). Adults with ACHD are becoming a rapidly increasing proportion of the adult medical and surgical population. The authors reviewed closed medical malpractice claims from 1970 to 2001 from the Anesthesia Closed Claims Project. This article describes the contribution of perioperative risk factors to adverse outcomes as well as comparing contributing factors in cardiac versus non-cardiac operations. All cases were assessed separately for factors contributing to the adverse event and factors contributing to patient injury. Qualitative assessments are also presented and common themes across the cases reviewed.
  5. Metzner J, Posner KL, Domino KB. The risk and safety of anesthesia at remote locations: the US closed claims analysis. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 22(4):502-8, 2009.  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Respiratory System Damaging Events, Quality of Care
    This analysis of claims since 1990 compared 87 claims for anesthesia in remote locations to 3287 claims from OR procedures. Remote location claims involved older and sicker patients and utilized MAC in 50% of claims. Claims from remote locations had more severe injuries than OR claims, with a higher proportion of death and respiratory damaging events. Our data suggests that anesthesia at remote locations poses a significant risk for the patient, particularly related to oversedation and inadequate oxygenation/ventilation during monitored anesthesia care.
  6. Robbertze R, Posner KL, Domino KB. Closed claims review of anesthesia for procedures outside the operating room. Current Opinion in Anesthesiology. 19(4):436-442, 2006.  |  NLM PubMed Link  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Respiratory System Damaging Events, Physiologic Monitoring
    Nonoperating-room anesthesia claims had a higher severity of injury and more substandard care than operating room claims. Inadequate oxygenation / ventilation was the most common mechanism of injury.

Abstract

  1. Metzner, J.I., Posner, K.L., Dutton, R., Domino, K.B.: Liability outside the operating room: comparison of NACOR cases with closed malpractice claims for gastroenterology, cardiology and radiology. Anesthesiology, A1009, 2015.  |  Subjects: Ambulatory, Offices, and Remote Locations, Professional Liability Related, Quality of Care  |  PDF icon click here for pdf.pdf

Newsletter

Closed Claims Bibliography

To access a complete bibliography of peer-reviewed journal articles from the Closed Claims Project, click here; Closed Claims Project Bibliography . You may also request delivery of the bibliography via e-mail, fax or postal mail.

Note to Patients

These studies are primarily designed to aid physicians in improving their clinical practice. We are sorry we cannot address individual patient questions or give medical or legal advice or provide data analysis.